Reader Responses, June 22, 2014

Published on Saturday, 21 June 2014 21:38 - Written by

CANTOR’S LOSS SHOWS THE MOOD OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE

The political landscape is as volatile as ever, but expect a decidedly conservative shift across the nation.

Not because House Majority Leader Eric Cantor got replaced, nor because the pro-amnesty “Texas Solution” got defeated at the Texas Republican State Convention last week. Expect a decidedly conservative shift because so-called “conservative extremists” are unwaveringly demanding such radical ideas as enforcing the laws we already have, government staying within the limits placed upon it by the U.S. Constitution and leaving people alone as they practice their faith publicly.

Since the Obama administration has not only violated the public trust, but seems determined to find new and creative ways to continue doing so, people are sick of government — specifically Democrat led, corrupt, government. People don’t want veterans treated badly, nor the IRS used as a political hit squad, nor our ambassadors murdered, nor to negotiate with terrorists and release them, nor to weaken our standing in the world. All this has been done quite handily under Obama. But the American people will no longer allow him and his fellow Democrats to play the blame game toward President Bush.

Because of their unwavering devotion to radical ideas like following the rule of law and abiding by the U.S. Constitution by conservatives and a repeated and flagrant disregard for justice, the rule of law and decency by the Democrats, the American people now see conservatives are right — and not just on the political spectrum. Just as a parent isn’t appreciated in the moment they require safe boundaries, so conservatives haven’t been appreciated when they spoke against Obama’s policies and actions. Now people see conservatives were right and want the good that comes from following the rules. Get ready for a conservative shift in elections.

Tim McCormick

Chairman,

Smith County Republican Party

 

GRADUATION

(On June 7), I saw my granddaughter graduate from Robert E. Lee High School, but it was not the joyous occasion it should have been. What should have been a happy but dignified ceremony was almost ruined by an unruly mob of spectators. I’ve never seen such a large number of rude, uncouth, and ill-mannered people totally lacking any common courtesy, both young and old.

When most of the names of the approximately 650 graduates were called, we were subjected to ear-splitting noises from air horns, and other noise-making devices, in addition to people yelling like wild banshees. Apparently most people think if the ceremony is held in a football stadium, then football game decorum is permissible.

The locale of a ceremony or activity does not dictate the type of permissible behavior, but rather the ceremony or activity being held there.

My next grandchild will graduate in five years, and I’m already dreading it if TISD does not institute a policy of proper decorum for graduation ceremony.

I suggest the following steps.

TISD has its own police force; it should station an officer at every gate and confiscate all noise-making devices people are trying to bring in.

Station police officers (in plainclothes, if necessary) throughout the stadium and evict anyone using a noise-making device.

Publicize the above policy in the media at least a week before graduation and notify the families of each graduate by letter of this policy.

Stephen Thompson

Tyler

 

FED UP

The equivalent of “David slaying Goliath” has happened again. In Virginia, challenger David Brat defeated House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the GOP primary. This was a political earthquake, a shockwave and a warning to the Republican and Democrat establishment: The vast majority of voting, taxpaying and law abiding citizens are completely fed up with Washington. The leadership of both parties put forth self-serving candidates.

America is fed up and ready to throw all the “money-changers and thieves” in both parties out of the “temple” in Washington.

Harry Bergman

Frankston