Role of pot candy in Okla. man's suspected suicide investigated

Published on Friday, 27 March 2015 13:05 - Written by

BRECKENRIDGE, Colo. (AP) — Authorities in Colorado are investigating whether marijuana candy played a role in the suspected suicide of a 22-year-old Oklahoma man.

Luke Gregory Goodman of Tulsa died Tuesday at a hospital after apparently shooting himself in the head. Witnesses say he ate several marijuana candies before the shooting while on vacation at the Keystone ski resort.

Summit County Coroner Regan Wood released a statement Thursday saying the circumstances surrounding Goodman's death are consistent with a suicide. But she said toxicology reports, which would confirm the presence of marijuana in his system and its possible role in his death, would take about three weeks to complete.

Goodman's cousin told investigators that Goodman ate four pot gummy bears, and he had not been drinking, according to a sheriff's report. The cousin told police that Goodman "was going overboard" during an intense debate about politics and religion, according to the report.

The cousin, Caleb Fowler, told KCNC-TV (http://cbsloc.al/1bvnKGu) that Goodman became jittery and incoherent several hours after eating the candy. They had purchased it earlier in the day at one of the state's legal recreational pot stores. He said Goodman ate two at one time when he could not immediately feel the effects of the first.

"He would make eye contact with us but didn't see us, didn't recognize our presence almost. He had never got close to this point. I had never seen him like this," Fowler told the television station. "It was almost like something else was speaking through him."

Authorities in Colorado are concerned about the effects of the increasingly popular pot candies, cookies and other edibles that can be exponentially more potent than a joint. Last year, a Wyoming college student jumped to his death from a hotel balcony after eating a potent marijuana cookie. About a month later, police charged a Denver man with fatally shooting his wife, who had told police dispatchers he was paranoid and hallucinating after eating pot candy.

Spurred by those cases, Colorado now has stricter potency limits on edibles.

Neither Fowler nor Goodman's parents returned messages from The Associated Press seeking comment. Goodman's parents, Kim and Greg, told police they had not seen any troubling issues recently with their son, according to the report. They said they knew he had recently purchased a handgun, which investigators said he used to shoot himself when his cousin and her girlfriend were downstairs in a hot tub, according to the sheriff's report.

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