VIDEO/UTT Commencement Address: Publisher delivers the 'secret sauce' for success

Published on Sunday, 15 December 2013 00:33 - Written by By Betty Waters blw@tylerpaper.com

A few essential ingredients for the secret sauce of success in life are to simplify, enjoy the journey and to satisfy yourself, Nelson Clyde told candidates for graduation at The University of Texas at Tyler.

Delivering the commencement address Saturday during two of four fall commencement ceremonies for several colleges at the university, Clyde spoke on what he said experience has led him to conclude is part of “the secret sauce of a successful life.”

The university conferred degrees on more than 1,000 students Friday and Saturday in the R. Don Cowan Fine and Performing Arts Center, President Dr. Rodney H. Mabry estimated in opening remarks.

Clyde, president of T.B. Butler Publishing Co. and publisher of the Tyler Morning Telegraph, was the commencement speaker for the colleges of business and technology, education and psychology and engineering and computer science.

“At my stage of life, age 49, and 27 years into my career,” Clyde said, “it is the people that make work meaningful to me. If my opportunity is to lean in and encourage someone to reach higher or find personal satisfaction in what they are doing, it is a lot more rewarding than simply making, accumulating or spending money. People matter and they are worth your time.”

Success is about finding contentment, Clyde said.

“If you find contentment, everything else will take care of itself. There will never be enough money so get over it. Now.”

Dorothy found contentment in the “Wizard of Oz” and George Bailey found it in “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Clyde said. “Something resonates with those stories. They are about what is truly important in this life — people and the relationships we share with them.”

Clyde continued, “Some relationships are painful, and some are joyful. Some people fill our tanks and others suck the very life out of us. We should dream big dreams and pursue the highest of ideals. But when your head hits the pillow at night, a contented mind is the one which will receive the greatest rest.”

Clyde first advised students to simplify.

“Keeping things simple and comfortable is important rather than pontificating prose or proclaiming some lofty standard to a tiny audience of intellectual elites,” Clyde said.

To simplify, Clyde advised, “let people know who you are, not what you know. Give yourself permission to be the best you can be. Be realistic and don’t strive for perfection. Performance is better than perfection.”

Enjoying the journey is hard, Clyde said.

“Society screams at us to focus on what is next. Where are you going? Are you satisfied with where and who you are?”

Clyde advised to be present with people. He suggested the graduates could do that by turning their cellphone to silent or by leaving it in the car when they meet someone at Starbucks or a movie.

“Have a real conversation with someone instead of sterilizing conversations with a text message and a g2go. Get less busy. … Find time for people, especially those closest to you,” Clyde urged.

He quoted Albert Einstein, who said, “A happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell too much on the future.”

Next, Clyde encouraged students to “satisfy yourself,” which he said can be “really tough.”

Clyde told the graduates, “For the last several years you have measured much of your work according to the grades you have been given. Now it is time to grade your own work. You will likely be a much harsher judge of yourself than others. But you will know better than anyone whether you cut corners or put your back into your work.”

Clyde added, “Measure yourself realistically and take satisfaction in it. Connect with peers who build you up and with mentors who care about your personhood.”

Clyde told the graduates, “If you focus on these things, it is my belief you will feel a success that will not depend on what you have, but will totally depend upon who you are. It is my sincere wish you would find your recipe for the secret sauce of your successful life. You will want to try different ingredients to suit your taste as you pursue a life filled with success, happiness and contentment.”

 

 

By Betty Waters

blw@tylerpaper.com

A few essential ingredients for the secret sauce of success in life are to simplify, enjoy the journey and to satisfy yourself, Nelson Clyde told candidates for graduation at The University of Texas at Tyler.

Delivering the commencement address Saturday during two of four fall commencement ceremonies for several colleges at the university, Clyde spoke on what he said experience has led him to conclude is part of “the secret sauce of a successful life.”

The university conferred degrees on more than 1,000 students Friday and Saturday in the R. Don Cowan Fine and Performing Arts Center, President Dr. Rodney H. Mabry estimated in opening remarks.

Clyde, president of T.B. Butler Publishing Co. and publisher of the Tyler Morning Telegraph, was the commencement speaker for the colleges of business and technology, education and psychology and engineering and computer science.

“At my stage of life, age 49, and 27 years into my career,” Clyde said, “it is the people that make work meaningful to me. If my opportunity is to lean in and encourage someone to reach higher or find personal satisfaction in what they are doing, it is a lot more rewarding than simply making, accumulating or spending money. People matter and they are worth your time.”

Success is about finding contentment, Clyde said.

“If you find contentment, everything else will take care of itself. There will never be enough money so get over it. Now.”

Dorothy found contentment in the “Wizard of Oz” and George Bailey found it in “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Clyde said. “Something resonates with those stories. They are about what is truly important in this life — people and the relationships we share with them.”

Clyde continued, “Some relationships are painful, and some are joyful. Some people fill our tanks and others suck the very life out of us. We should dream big dreams and pursue the highest of ideals. But when your head hits the pillow at night, a contented mind is the one which will receive the greatest rest.”

Clyde first advised students to simplify.

“Keeping things simple and comfortable is important rather than pontificating prose or proclaiming some lofty standard to a tiny audience of intellectual elites,” Clyde said.

To simplify, Clyde advised, “let people know who you are, not what you know. Give yourself permission to be the best you can be. Be realistic and don’t strive for perfection. Performance is better than perfection.”

Enjoying the journey is hard, Clyde said.

“Society screams at us to focus on what is next. Where are you going? Are you satisfied with where and who you are?”

Clyde advised to be present with people. He suggested the graduates could do that by turning their cellphone to silent or by leaving it in the car when they meet someone at Starbucks or a movie.

“Have a real conversation with someone instead of sterilizing conversations with a text message and a g2go. Get less busy. … Find time for people, especially those closest to you,” Clyde urged.

He quoted Albert Einstein, who said, “A happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell too much on the future.”

Next, Clyde encouraged students to “satisfy yourself,” which he said can be “really tough.”

Clyde told the graduates, “For the last several years you have measured much of your work according to the grades you have been given. Now it is time to grade your own work. You will likely be a much harsher judge of yourself than others. But you will know better than anyone whether you cut corners or put your back into your work.”

Clyde added, “Measure yourself realistically and take satisfaction in it. Connect with peers who build you up and with mentors who care about your personhood.”

Clyde told the graduates, “If you focus on these things, it is my belief you will feel a success that will not depend on what you have, but will totally depend upon who you are. It is my sincere wish you would find your recipe for the secret sauce of your successful life. You will want to try different ingredients to suit your taste as you pursue a life filled with success, happiness and contentment.”