Stick and Bindle Vintage: One-of-a-kind clothing and furniture create unique style for owner, customers

Published on Sunday, 18 June 2017 14:17 - Written by SARAH A MILLER, smiller@tylerpaper.com

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Pulling up to his Brick Street District home in a red 1981 Honda SR Scooter and wearing a matching red plaid shirt and baseball cap filled with pins referencing pop culture designs, it’s clear that personal style is important to Michael Brundidge.

Brundidge is the man behind Stick and Bindle Vintage, 412 W. Rusk St., in Tyler. The store, which operates out of his front yard Thursday through Saturday, is a conglomeration of all the vintage things Brundidge loves - 1950s’ atomic designs, vinyl records, ’80s’ graphic T-shirts, old mopeds, mid-century modern furniture and art. 

“My main goal is to create individuality through originality,” Brundidge said. “Most vintage items that you find are one-of-a-kind pieces, especially clothing because people threw clothing away, donated it or set it in a closet for years and years and never touched it again.”

Items at Stick and Bindle Vintage originate from the 1930s to the early 1980s. Anything 25 years old or older is considered vintage. Brundidge’s preference is to collect high-quality American-made items from this time period before mass production became the norm.

“Nowadays, things just fall apart and everything’s so disposable, whereas you find these items that are much older and they really have this certain past to them,” he said.

Brundidge finds most of the items at thrift stores and estate sales. One of his favorite finds is a 1950s Emerson Hi Fi record player. 

“The sound you’re hearing is the same sound you’d hear in the ’50s,” he said.

Next to the record player are two Sam Avedon scoop chairs purchased from a person who had kept them on a porch in Rusk for the past 50 years. 

Vintage pieces like furniture or clothing can convey a person’s individual style and serve as conversation starters at social events.

“When you find original pieces, you have a one-of-a-kind item,” he said. “You get to set that within your home, in your own style; it’s totally you and it fits who you are as a person and how you want to convey yourself to others.” 

The next goal for Brundidge is take his store on the road as the store name implies. He hopes to purchase a trailer and become a mobile pop-up vintage store with the ability to sell at festivals and community events.

Stick and Bindle Vintage is open noon to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.

To see Brundidge’s latest finds, view the store online at facebook.com/stickandbindlevintage.