Weighing In: Fight the food pushers

Published on Saturday, 12 July 2014 17:48 - Written by Coshandra Dillard cdillard@tylerpaper.com

Weight loss is an ultimate test of discipline. As we know, our environment is more likely to change us than we are to change our environment. That is why it’s very easy to find yourself on a slippery slope to old habits when you’re around people who don’t need to lose weight or who don’t care to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

You know the ones: “A little piece won’t hurt.” Before long, you’ve had more than a little piece and you justified it as a cheat meal or a reward for a great workout earlier in the day.

What on earth can you do? You wouldn’t ditch family and friends only because they insist on eating a platter of fried catfish and fries in front of you.

I’ve always believed that change doesn’t happen until you’ve wrestled with it in your head. So, if your mind is made up that you won’t go back down a road of mindless overeating, then you probably don’t have anything to worry about.

Still, if those who are close to you insist on eating at certain places or pressure you to share calorie-laden food, then you have to develop a strategy.

Don’t back down from your goals. Learn to enjoy company without food and drink.

If you join people for dinner or are invited to a cookout, drink plenty of water and skip the sugary drinks. Look up nutritional information ahead of time, if possible. If you’re unsure about nutritional content, enjoy the food but limit portions or fill up on fruits and vegetables if they’re available. If all else fails, prepare food to be eaten when you return home if the pickings are too heavy.

If you feel someone is not supportive of your healthier lifestyle, let him or her know. They’re more likely to understand if they know your struggle. If they still don’t respect your choices, maybe you can dine without them.

It’s always better to stand firm in doing what’s best for you rather than being a people pleaser. Ultimately, no one else is responsible for your weight loss failures.

Temptation, peer pressure or guilt trips may be real, but so are the rewards of accomplishing a great feat: becoming healthy while looking and feeling good.